Hairbrush Stuck In Your Hair?  How To Get Free.

Hairbrush Stuck In Your Hair? How To Get Free.

Help!  There is a hairbrush stuck in my head and I can’t get it out!  Do you have any idea how painful this is? It’s almost as bad as having a baby with no anesthesia.  (I said almost.) Who knew that an innocent plastic, round brush with plastic bristles could cause me such anguish? Of course,  I had just 15 minutes to get dressed and do my hair before my family is supposed to go out for dinner.  And the more I pulled, the more the brush adhered to my head.  This was torture–the worst kind– self administered! And, sorry, even if I wanted to…at the time that this picture was taken, there was NO WAY I could vlog about this experience.

Who needs water boarding when you can have a plastic brush pulling your hair out one by one miserable strand?

Help!  There's something in my hair!

Help! There’s something in my hair!

Don’t ask me how I got the brush stuck in my hair. Something about having fine hair but a lot of it?  All I can tell you is my first inclination was to get a pair of kitchen shears (you know the kind with which you use to cut raw chicken?) and cut off the offending section of hair. So, I did the next best thing; I called Adam and asked for help.  When he arrived in the bathroom (without a pair of scissors) Adam couldn’t help but laugh. I guess the image of me with a brush adhered to my head was too much for him.  But he sobered up as soon as I started crying and begging that he (a) call my mother to get advice about what to do and (b) cut my hair.  He refused to do both stating quite simply that my mother wouldn’t have a clue how to help me and  he was not going to be responsible for my looking like an 80’s rock star.

We called Adam’s hair stylist in Chicago–did I mention that we were in Florida when this trauma occurred?  And left a message on his voicemail.  So much for getting professional help.  We tried “googling” a solution and came up with a variety of answers most of which ended with cutting out the hair.  Finally, we patched together a solution:

Items You’ll Need:

• Baby oil

• Knitting Needle/”Rat tail” comb

• Wide tooth comb

• Shampoo

• Conditioner

The Process: 

1  Find a sympathetic friend who is willing to help you. (At this point, it is also helpful for your friend to bring you a shot or two of whisky or tequila–unless of course if you are under age–or a few Tylenol because this is going to be a really long and arduous process.)

2.  Apply a generous amount of oil (preferably baby) to the tangled area. Dab the oil on the tangle with your fingers but be careful not to rub the hair and tangle it more.

3. Getting strands out takes some time so you’ll need to be patient:

  • Stick the tip of the knitting needle or rat tail comb about 1/4 inch into the end of the brush below the hair & insert it on an upward angle between the bristles so the end pokes out through the hair.  
  • Gently pull and tug upward at the tiny strand and slide the end of the comb back and forth beneath it. 
  • Keep loosening the strand until the end slides out of the bristles.

4. Keep the end of the sharp point underneath the strand of hair and grasp the end of the strand with your fingers. Push away from the end of the strand while lifting it up and away from the brush by the ends.

5. Once a strand is free: Clip it with a bobby pin as not to re-tangle it. (And now for the lengthy part of the process.) Repeat the same procedure you used for the first strand until most of the hair is free or you just can’t stand the pain.  

6. Hopefully most of the hair has come out of the hairbrush and you are left with a matted, knotty strand of greasy, oily hair.

7. Hop in the shower and set it to the highest possible temperature that you can stand.  Lather the hair with conditioner (BE GENEROUS!) and practice some deep breathing exercises as you wait for the conditioner to penetrate your messy hair.  Now use a wide tooth comb to untangle the matted hair.  Gently comb out the knots from the ends working your way upwards as the knots untangle

8. Once the knots are out and you are finally free from the brushes of bondage, rinse everything out of your hair.  Now wash your hair with (preferably) a deep clarifying shampoo. It may take several shampoos to remove all of the oil and conditioner from your hair.

9. Rinse and repeat as many times as needed until your hair is squeaky clean. Finish with a deep conditioner to seal the damaged areas.

We have all done some really stupid things in our time.  Case and point? The forehead hickey Lulu got a few years ago from sticking a small plunger (meant to hold my iPod) on her face: http://windycitymomma.com/2011/07/20/an-unexpected-forehead-hickey.  I guess it was just my turn to do something idiotic, huh?  Watch out Adam!  You’re next!

 

 

Finding Work-Life Balance By Taking A Break From Social Media

Finding Work-Life Balance By Taking A Break From Social Media

I’ve often read about parents’ constant struggles to achieve work-life balance.  Living in a 24/7 society (as the cliche goes) is challenging when you are (a) trying to keep your job and on top of all of your work and (b) trying to set a good example for your children.  My husband, Adam, is often asked how he achieves this balance and makes it seem so “seamless.”  If you follow his tweets (@akeats) or see his pictures on Facebook, you know that Adam is a great cook.  You also know that he spends a lot of time online–posting pictures of his food and commenting on it. So how does Adam balance his online status with staying tuned in with the happens (literally) at the dinner table?  The answer is embedded in the following Dove Men+Care interview with Brad Powell from Dad Labs:

Video streaming by Ustream

Remember those New Year’s Resolutions we made a month ago? You know the resolution that Lulu asked Adam (and me?) to put down the smart phones and have a conversation with her?  No one believed that Adam would do it–including me.  In the past few years, I can’t tell you the number of times that dinner (whether at home or at a restaurant) has been disrupted by Adam’s phone buzzing with some social media urgency–be it business or personal.  Each time it happens, our family discussions are totally derailed by Adam needing to either look at his phone  and texting someone or by his actually leaving the table to respond to a tweet or text.

Fast forward a month and guess what?  Adam took Lulu’s suggestion to heart.  Now, when he comes home from work, unless he know that there is something going on and he needs to be “on point,”  Adam typically goes upstairs to our room,  plugs his phone into a charger and then returns to the kitchen/family room to help with dinner sans (without)  phone.

The change in our family’s social dynamic was subtle.  I am not sure that either Lulu or I noticed what he was (or was not) doing  But looking back over the past month’s dinners together, I can honestly say that there has been a definite difference in how our family communicates and relates to each other.  Where there once there was a fourth “person” at the table–Dad’s phone, now there are just three of us.  I’ve noticed Adam asking Lulu a lot more questions about what she is learning in school and interacting with her in a way that he couldn’t when his phone was constantly buzzing.  Now, Lulu knows that she has her father’s undivided attention for at least 30 minutes. I think that the time has also helped strengthen their relationship. She even saves some of her best stories for dinner–when both Adam and I can both hear them for the first time.

Adam has even extended this non-social media bubble for ten additional minutes post dinner.  He makes a point to listen to Lulu’s (often out-of-tune) cello practice and comments on what he liked and didn’t like about her playing.  (I just learned that Lulu taught herself “Ode To Joy” on the cello because she knows that her father loves it and not because she has to play it for a school concert!  Now that’s L-O-V-E!)

The point of this post isn’t to brag about my exceptional spouse.  (Really!) If you don’t believe me, take a look at our Today Show piece. Adam’s plenty flawed.  But he has  succeeded in doing something that many of us complain about wanting to do but are still clinging to habits from the past: He figured out how to disconnect (at least for 30 minutes a day) and invest that time in his relationship with his family.   And he has seen significant return on his investment–he has stopped being a “weekend” dad and is now much more of a “day-to-day” one.  These are precious times in our children’s lives and they go by really quickly.  I am so glad that Adam’s not going to miss them.

What do you think of Adam’s methods for investing in “family time?”  Would you be able/willing to put down the phone, iPad, close the laptop and turn off the TV for 30 minutes if it meant you might be able to connect with your kids?  It’s a lot harder than it sounds.  But…if Adam teaches us anything, it can be done.  Trust me, your kids may not vocalize their gratitude but they will notice the improvement in their relationships with you.

The "Real" Adam

The “Real” Adam

Here's the image on the back of his phone.  Get the point?

Here’s the image on the back of his phone.
Get the point?